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US Lacrosse - The National Governing Body of Lacrosse

CONNETQUOT YOUTH LACROSSE LEAGUE

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DID YOU KNOW?

The More You Know...

ANSWERS TO COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE GAME

Q: WHAT IS THE POINT OF LACROSSE? HOW IS IT PLAYED?

A: YOUTH LACROSSE HAS DIFFERENT LEVELS OF PLAY AT DIFFERENT AGE LEVELS AND A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BOYS & GIRLS

Anyone can play lacrosse--the big or the small! The game requires and rewards coordination and agility, not brawn. Quickness and speed are two highly prized qualities in lacrosse. Long sprints up and down the field with abrupt starts and stops, precision passes, and dodges are routine in both boys and girls lacrosse. Lacrosse is played with a stick, the crosse, which must be mastered by the player to throw, catch, and scoop the ball. The object of the game is to shoot the ball into the opponent's goal with the team scoring the most goals wins. Youth games are 48 minutes long, with twelve-minute quarters. Each team is given a two-minute break between the first and second quarters, and the third and fourth quarters. Halftime is ten minutes long. Teams change sides between periods. Each team is permitted two timeouts each half. The team winning the coin toss chooses the end of the field it wants to defend first. Referees monitor the physical play to help prevent injuries and out-and-out brawls.
  • Boys youth lacrosse is a contact game played by two teams with 10 players per side: a goalie, three defensemen, three midfielders and three attackmen. Each team must keep at least four players, including the goalie, in its defensive half of the field and three in its offensive half. Three players (midfielders) may roam the entire field. Lacrosse has many similarities to both basketball and hockey. A faceoff at the center circle starts each game and each quarter, and it begins play after every goal scored. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse with a stick check. A stick check is the controlled poking and slapping of the stick and gloved hands of the player in possession of the ball. Body checking is permitted if the opponent has the ball or is within five yards of a loose ball. All body contact must occur from the front or side, above the waist and below the shoulders, and with both hands on the stick. Body checking is not permitted at U7, U9 and U11 levels. An opponent's crosse may also be stick checked if it is within five yards of a loose ball or ball in the air.  Only midfielders can run the entire field without restriction.
  • Girls youth lacrosse is a non-contact game played by two teams with 12 players per side: a goalkeeper, five attackers and six defenders. The ball is placed between two horizontally held crosses (sticks) at the center of the field. At the sound of the whistle, the ball is flung into the air as the crosses are pulled up and away. A draw is used to start each half and after each goal, and it takes place at the center of the field. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse with a stick check. A stick check is the controlled poking and slapping of the stick and gloved hands of the player in possession of the ball. Rough checks, and contact to the body with the crosse or body, are not allowed. Field players may pass, catch or run with the ball in their crosse. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse with a check. A check is a controlled tap with a crosse on an opponent's crosse in an attempt to knock the ball free. The player must be one step in front of her opponent in order to check. No player may reach across an opponent's body to check the handle of a crosse when she is even with or behind that opponent. A player may not protect the ball in her crosse by cradling so close to her body or face so as to make a legal, safe check impossible for the opponent. Only midfielders can run the entire field  without restriction.

Q: WHAT ARE LACROSSE TERMS?

A: TAKEN FROM THE  US LACROSSE 2014 GUIDEBOOK, A FEW HELPFUL TERMS:

  • Body Check: contact with an opponent from the front or side (but not a blind side check) between the shoulders and waist when the opponent has the ball or is within 3 yards of a loose ball. Not permitted at U9 and U11 levels.
  • Loose Ball: a ball that is not in possession of a player is referred to as a loose ball. Players will attempt to gain possession by scooping the ball off the ground. This is a technique practiced by players and involves lowering the body and hands and using the stick like a shovel to pick up the ball. The act of gaining possession of a loose ball is called a ground ball. At the U9 and U11 level players must play the ball when competing for ground balls. While incidental contact is allowed they cannot intentionally body check their opponent. 
  • Violent Collisions: Some body contact is permitted at all levels of boys’ youth lacrosse, with progressively more age-appropriate contact permitted as players become more physically mature and learn proper checking techniques. There is no justification for deliberate and excessively violent collision by any player at any youth level, especially intentional player-to-player collisions with defenseless players. The 2014 NFHS Rules and US Lacrosse Boys Youth Rules more clearly define such violent collisions and in many cases increase the severity of the penalties that prohibit them. All participants must work together to reduce or eliminate such violent collision from the game. 
  • Cradle: The act of moving the stick from side to side causing the ball to remain in the upper part of the pocket webbing.
  • Checking: The act of using a controlled tap with a crosse on an opponent's crosse in an attempt to dislodge the ball.  
  • Catching: The act of receiving a passed ball with the crosse. 
  • Cutting: A movement by a player without the ball in anticipation of a pass. 
  • Dodging: The act of suddenly shifting direction in order to avoid an opponent.
  • Passing: The act of throwing the ball to a teammate with the crosse. 
  • Pick-Ups: The act of scooping a loose ball with a crosse.
  • Shootings:The act of throwing the ball at the goal with the crosse in an attempt to score.

Q: WHERE DO YOU PLAY?

A: WE KEEP IT AS LOCAL AS POSSIBLE

The outdoor lacrosse season runs from March through early June.  Practices occur during the week at the local School fields with games played or Sundays.  Home games are played on the HS turf fields and at Locust Ave Town Park. 

Q: WHAT DO I NEED TO PLAY?

A: IT ALL DEPENDS UPON THE TEAM YOU PLAY

Boys • Lacrosse helmet • Mouthpiece • Shoulder pads • Arm pads • Gloves • Boys LAX stick • Athletic supporter/cup • Rib pads
Girls • Lacrosse goggles/eyewear • Mouthpiece • Girls LAX stick 
Q: WHAT IF I DON'T HAVE MEDICAL OR DENTAL INSURANCE? THINGS ALWAYS HAPPEN IN SPORTS.

A: BY BECOMING A MEMBER OF US LACROSSE, YOU'RE COVERED THE DAY YOU PAY.
An annual membership to US Lacrosse provides you with coverage through their US Lacrosse Insurance program, which provides both a general liability policy as well as accident medical insurance. 

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